Morrisania, 1855

by William Rickarby Miller (1818–1893)

Watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper laid down on board
15⅝ x 19¾ inches
Signed, inscribed, and dated lower left: W. R. Miller. / “The Dead Tree.” Morrisania. N.Y. / July. 1855.

View additional works by William Rickarby Miller
Read more about William Rickarby Miller

Information

Provenance
Estate of Arthur F. Goat, South Pomfret, Vermont
Sale, Skinner, Marlborough, Massachusetts, August 9, 2014, lot 408
Private collection, Worcester, Massachusetts

 

Note: Morrisania, now a neighborhood in the Bronx, was once an estate of 2000 acres along the Harlem River owned since the 1670s by the aristocratic Morris family, one of whom was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and another a penman for the United States Constitution.

Artist Biography

William was the son of the English landscape painter, Joseph Miller and most likely studied under him in England. In the winter of 1844, William immigrated to America and settled in New York City. He initially worked as a portraitist, but then began traveling across the Eastern U.S. to discover new landscape subjects. Throughout Miller’s prolific career, he completed landscapes in oils, watercolors, and pen and ink. He also produced a myriad of sketches as well as fruit still lifes. He exhibited at the National Academy of Design, the Brooklyn Art Association, and the American Art

Read More

William was the son of the English landscape painter, Joseph Miller and most likely studied under him in England. In the winter of 1844, William immigrated to America and settled in New York City. He initially worked as a portraitist, but then began traveling across the Eastern U.S. to discover new landscape subjects. Throughout Miller’s prolific career, he completed landscapes in oils, watercolors, and pen and ink. He also produced a myriad of sketches as well as fruit still lifes. He exhibited at the National Academy of Design, the Brooklyn Art Association, and the American Art Union. His works are housed in the collections of the New York Historical Society.

Read Less

Contact Us About This Painting


Go To Top