East River, View of Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan Bridge

by Arthur Cohen (1928–2012)
Oil on canvas
8 x 10 inches
On stretcher bar: (east river / view of Bklyn Bridge– / (from Manhattan bridge–) / Arthur Cohen

Information

Provenance

Private collection, New York, New York

Note: A resident of New York City his entire life (with summers in Provincetown, Massachusetts), Arthur Cohen frequently depicted the iconic Brooklyn Bridge. This view faces southwest.

Artist Biography

Born in Manhattan and raised in the Bronx, New York, Arthur Cohen is known for his scenes of New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. From the late 1940s to early 1950s he studied at Cooper Union, with Edwin Dickinson (1891–1978) and Robert Gwathmey (1903–1988), and at the Art Students League with Reginald Marsh (1898–1954). Cohen lived his entire life in New York City, apart from annual stays in Provincetown. His frequent subjects included the iconic Brooklyn Bridge, Flatiron Building, Provincetown harbor and shore, as well as domestic interior scenes. He worked as an etcher and a painter. Cohen once commented,

Read More

Born in Manhattan and raised in the Bronx, New York, Arthur Cohen is known for his scenes of New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. From the late 1940s to early 1950s he studied at Cooper Union, with Edwin Dickinson (1891–1978) and Robert Gwathmey (1903–1988), and at the Art Students League with Reginald Marsh (1898–1954). Cohen lived his entire life in New York City, apart from annual stays in Provincetown. His frequent subjects included the iconic Brooklyn Bridge, Flatiron Building, Provincetown harbor and shore, as well as domestic interior scenes. He worked as an etcher and a painter. Cohen once commented, “The paint is its own subject, and light is almost all of the answer. Once I’m into the work, light becomes paint and a pathway to the painting.”[1] Among his awards is the Adolf and Clara Obrig Prize from the 1977 National Academy annual exhibition. Cohen’s work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, and National Academy of Design.



Read Less

Related Works

Contact Us About This Painting





    This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

      Go To Top