Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919)

Famous for his rustic genre subjects, Edward Lamson Henry was America’s most significant painter of colonial life. His charming, intricately-detailed work celebrated lost customs and communities, revealing a deep appreciation for America’s colonial roots. Henry first trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts before journeying to Paris to study with Gustave Courbet and Charles Gleyre. He was highly successful in his day, extracting high prices and boasting a list of top patrons including Albert Bierstadt and William Astor. He exhibited at the National Academy of Design for sixty years and was awarded medals at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893), the Buffalo Exposition (1901), the Charleston Exposition (1902) and the St. Louis Exposition (1904). His work can now be found in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Butler Institute of American Art, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

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